Winter, 2014

It's 2014! Why not start the year with lifestyle changes to improve your health during and after cancer treatment? To keep it simple, we created a list: 5 habits to start and 4 to stop. Taking one change at a time will improve your odds for success. Give yourself a month for each goal to allow it to become a habit before trying the next on the list.
It might seem like a lot of waiting when you come to the Cancer Center for infusion, but there is good reason. Pharmacists and technicians have important roles in preparing each dose of chemotherapy, making your safety our top priority.
A new era in American health care has arrived: a time when everyone can get affordable health insurance coverage, no matter what your health history. Your cancer diagnosis cannot prevent you from getting insurance and, in fact, you might even have options to think about that cost less.
When you're diagnosed with cancer, everyone's first priority is doing what they can to get rid of it. You may need surgery. Your oncologist might prescribe chemotherapy or radiation. These things can take a toll on your body, even when the cancer is gone. Whether you're in treatment or done with treatment, physical and/or occupational therapy can help you get back to life as usual.
The Cancer Center's Patient Education Resource Center gives patients easy access to our complete library of all things cancer. And now, thanks to a major renovation, the PERC has a new and improved location and more up-to-date information than ever. Conveniently located on level B2 of the Cancer Center, next to blood draw, the PERC is open Monday through Friday, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., to all patients and family members.
Meet Laura Fliss, a successful, busy mother of two facing cancer of unknown primary, also called CUP. What makes CUP unique is that it is advanced to the point where its genetic characteristics are lost, making it impossible to identify where the cancer started. For this reason, it is almost always metastatic and difficult to treat.
One Cancer Center patient's story of treatment success when advances in care led to a new option for patients with metastatic stomach cancer: Patient Randy Hillard is happier than he's ever been after a new treatment option led to no evidence of stomach cancer for months, then years.
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